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Collegio del Cambio
Collegio del Cambio

Collegio del Cambio

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Corso Vannucci 25, Perugia, Italy, 06121

The basics

The Collegio del Cambio was built between 1452 and 1457 to house Perugia’s money changers and has three spectacular main halls decorated with some of the city’s finest art. To fully understand the history of Perugia’s important guilds and appreciate the Collegio's sumptuous interiors, visit with a guide on a walking tour of Perugia’s historic center. Day trips to Perugia may include stops in the nearby medieval hill towns of Assisi or Spoleto, as well as stroll through the village of Passignano on Lake Trasimeno.

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Things to know before you go

  • Art history aficionados will especially enjoy admiring the important early Renaissance art decorating the Collegio.
  • The halls of the Collegio are accessible by wheelchair, though the historic center of Perugia has steep, cobblestone streets that may be difficult to navigate on wheels.
  • Walking tours of Perugia’s historic center require a significant amount of time on your feet. Choose comfortable shoes and dress for the weather.
  • The Collegio is located at the far end of Perugia’s main thoroughfare, lined with shops, cafès, and restaurants.
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How to get there

The Nobile Collegio del Cambio is located in Palazzo dei Priori at the top of pedestrian Corso Vannucci in the heart of the city’s historic center. As it’s the capital of Umbria, Perugia is connected to Rome and Florence by direct train.

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When to get there

Perugia holds a popular jazz festival each year in July, when Corso Vannucci is crowded with street musicians and fans. Visit during the festival to experience the city at its most vibrant.

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The Ornate Interiors of the Nobile Collegio del Cambio

The Collegio has three main halls: the Sala dei Legisti (Lawyers Chamber) has intricately carved 17th-century wooden stalls by Giampiero Zuccari; the Sala dell’Udienza (Audience Chamber) is home to perhaps the city’s finest frescoes by Perugino; and the Chapel of San Giovanni Battista was painted by Giannicola di Paolo, student of Perugino.

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