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Church of San Maurizio al Monastero Maggiore (Chiesa di San Maurizio al Monastero Maggiore)
Church of San Maurizio al Monastero Maggiore (Chiesa di San Maurizio al Monastero Maggiore)

Church of San Maurizio al Monastero Maggiore (Chiesa di San Maurizio al Monastero Maggiore)

Free admission
Chiesa di San Maurizio al Monastero Maggiore, Milan, Milan

The Basics

Built in the early 1500s, San Maurizio al Monastero Maggiore is one of the oldest surviving structures in Milan. The church is attached to a Benedictine convent—the oldest convent in the city—which today houses the archaeological museum. The church is often featured on Milan history and art tours, which typically include a visit to da Vinci’s famous The Last Supper with skip-the-line admission. For a personalized experience, book a private tour to explore the ancient structures of Milan and the city’s hidden gems.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • The Chiesa di San Maurizio al Monastero Maggiore is a must-see for art and architecture lovers.

  • Entrance to the church is free.

  • Visitors with limited mobility can access the church through the archaeological museum.

  • Groups of more than 10 must book at least two weeks in advance, and only two groups are allowed in the church at any given time.

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How to Get There

San Maurizio al Monastero Maggiore is located at Corso Magenta 15. To get there by public transit, take the M1 metro line to Cadorna or Cairoli. Alternatively, take tram 16 to Corso Magenta via Nirone or Via Meravigli.

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Trip ideas


When to Get There

The church is open Tuesday to Sunday from 9:30am to 7:30pm. Milan gets very busy during the summer season, so it’s a good idea visit the church during the shoulder seasons due to its small size.

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The “Sistine Chapel of Milan”

The opulent Chiesa di San Maurizio al Monastero Maggiore is one of the most revered churches in the city, along with the famous Milan Cathedral (Duomo di Milano). It was rebuilt during the Renaissance era, and many artists from the school of Leonardo were commissioned to paint its frescoes. Restored over 30 years into the 2010s, the church’s more than 40,000 square feet (4,000 square meters) of frescoes earned it the nickname the “Sistine Chapel of Milan.”

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