Recent Searches
Clear
Hungerburg Railway (Hungerburgbahn)
Hungerburg Railway (Hungerburgbahn)

Hungerburg Railway (Hungerburgbahn)

star-4.5
124 Reviews
Rennweg 3, Innsbruck, 6020

The Basics

The Hungerburgbahn sets out from the Congress Underground station in Innsbruck Old Town. From there, trains stop at Lowenhaus station and Alpenzoo station before reaching the Hungerburg station at 2,811 feet (857 meters). At Hungerburg station, the funicular links to the Nordpark Cable Railway (Nordkettenbahnen), and visitors can continue on one of two cable cars—to the 6,250-foot (1,905-meter) summit of Seegrube or the 7,546-foot (2,300-meter) summit of Hafelekar, part of the Karwendel Nature Park.

Show all

Things to Know Before You Go

  • Each station has an observation deck, affording magnificent 360-degree views over the surrounding mountains.

  • The journey from Congress station to the Hungerburg takes just 8 minutes. The total journey time to reach the top of the Hafelekar takes just 20 minutes.

  • Adventurous travelers can enjoy outdoor activities including hiking, mountain biking, climbing, skiing, and hang gliding at the Hafelekar and Seegrube peaks.

  • The Hungerburgbahn can get busy at peak times—prebook your tickets to avoid waiting in line.

  • The Innsbruck Card includes one round-trip ticket for the funicular.

Show all

How to Get There

The Hungerburgbahn sets out from Congress Underground station in Innsbruck and can easily be reached on foot from anywhere in the Old Town. It’s about a 15-minute walk or a 5-minute taxi ride from Innsbruck train station, and plenty of parking is available at the station.

Show all

When to Get There

The Hungerburgbahn runs daily, with service every 15 minutes from early morning to evening (and longer hours on Saturday). When to visit depends largely on your choice of activities. Summer is the best time to hike and visit the Alpine Zoo, while the main ski season is from December to March.

Show all

Architecture of the Hungerburgbahn

The futuristic railway is the work of British Iraqi architect Zaha Hadid, who was also responsible for Innsbruck’s famous Bergisel Ski Jump Stadium. Each station has a unique glacier-inspired design, sculpted from gleaming white panels and double curved glass that blends with the snow-covered landscapes. The funicular itself is equally innovative, using a special hydraulic tilting system that allows the carriages to remain horizontal even while traveling at a steep gradient.

Show all