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Temple of Augustus (Temple d'August)
Temple of Augustus (Temple d'August)

Temple of Augustus (Temple d'August)

Free admission
Carrer Paradís, 10, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain, 08002

The Basics

The Temple of Augustus was once an important place of worship in the Roman city of Barcino. The existing columns were discovered in the late 19th century and were restored by the architect Puig i Cadafalch in the early 20th century. The site can be difficult to find, and is only marked by a small overhead sign, so it’s best to visit on one of the many walking tours that take visitors through the Gothic Quarter. Visit on a guided tour that highlights secret locations throughout the neighborhood, including spots like the Basilica of Santa Maria del Mar and Plaça del Rei.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • Make sure to check the hours of operation before you visit the temple; access is limited on Mondays.

  • The room where the columns are located isn’t large, but there is a bench where you can sit, relax, and take in the history.

  • Don’t rely on technology to get you to the temple. The alleyways in the area are so small that GPS often gets confused; don’t be afraid to break out a map.

  • The temple is not far from other noteworthy landmarks, including Plaça Sant Felip Neri and Palau de la Generalitat de Catalunya.

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How to Get There

Made up of labyrinthine, cobblestone alleyways, Barcelona’s Gothic Quarter is best seen on foot. Take metro line L4 to the Jaume I stop for the shortest walk to the temple, or take metro line L3 to the Liceu stop for a more scenic walk through the neighborhood.

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Trip ideas


When to Get There

The Temple of Augustus is often a stop on tour groups’ routes, and it can get busy during tour hours. If you’d like to see the columns with few others around, visit in the evening. Be aware that the temple closes early on Mondays.

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The Ancient City of Barcino

The Roman colony of Barcino was established between 15 and 13 BC in what is now Barcelona’s Gothic Quarter. To see more of the ancient city’s remains, head to the top of Mont Tàber, where Plaça Sant Jaume now sits; take a walking tour of remaining pieces of the old city wall; and stop by the Museu d'Història de la Ciutat (MUHBA) to see excavated ceramics and a 6th-century Roman church.

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